Tricks to Make this Halloween a Treat!

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MESA COUNTY, COLORADO – Halloween is a fun holiday for kids, but for parents, trick-or-treat time can be worrisome.  The following safety tips will help ensure that Halloween will be a fun, safe, and memorable event for all families.

Costume Selection

Costumes should be fire safe; store-bought costumes should have a flame-resistant or flame-retardant label. Costumes should allow free movement, but should not have parts that trail or drag.  Masks should provide clear vision from the front, sides, and bottom.  Finally, all props, such as fake knives, swords, guns, or weapons of any kind, should be make from cardboard or flexible materials to prevent accidental injury and avoid being mistaken for the real thing.  Be sure to take pictures of your trick-or-treaters in costume so that they could be easily identified by emergency personnel, if necessary.

Rules for the Street

An adult or trusted teen should determine the route and accompany their trick-or-treaters. If the trick-or-treaters are walking, they should carry a flashlight or glow sticks, cross streets only at intersections and designated crosswalks, and avoid major intersections whenever possible.  If an adult is driving the trick-or-treaters from place to place, they should drive slower than the posted speed limit, activate hazard lights to alert other motorists that they are driving slowly and making frequent stops, and anticipate children that may not be paying attention and could dart into traffic.

Back Home and Safe

Treats should not be eaten until an adult has checked them. Check the treats for any sign of tampering with the wrappers.  Pay special attention to homemade treats; don’t allow your children to eat them unless you know and trust the source.  Be sure to talk about anything that may have troubled or frightened your child while they were out and about.  Finally, be sure to report any suspicious or criminal activity you observe by dialing 911 for emergencies, or 242-6707 for non-emergencies.

Crime Stoppers Crime of the Week #MCCrimeStoppers #GVCopBeat

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Crime Stoppers LogoThe Fruita Police Department needs your help to identify and locate the subjects involved in a burglary.

Sometime between 6:00 am and 4:00 pm on Tuesday, September 13th unknown suspects unlawfully entered a residence located in the 300 block of N. Coulson Street in Fruita. While inside, the suspects removed ten firearms; including two Remington Arms rifles, one Winchester rifle with a gold plated trigger, one Stevens Arms rifle, one Savage Arms rifle, one Beretta pistol, four Ruger pistols, and various calibers of ammunition. The total estimated property loss is over $5,600.

If you know the identity or location of the subjects involved in this crime, please call Crime Stoppers at 241-7867. Information reported to Crime Stoppers that leads to an arrest can earn you up to $1,000 cash reward and you will remain completely anonymous. For more information, see us at http://www.241stop.com.

Fruita PD Case# 2016-6246

Local Law Enforcement Makes Arrests in Recent National Child Exploitation Investigation #GVCopBeat

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cuffsLast week, several local law enforcement agencies took part in the tenth annual Operation Cross County.  This initiative, spearheaded by the FBI and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, targets the criminals responsible for the sex trafficking of children.

“Operation Cross Country aims to shine a spotlight into the darkest corners of our society that seeks to prey on the most vulnerable of our population,” said FBI Director Comey, announcing the results of the operation during a press conference yesterday in San Diego at the International Association of Chiefs of Police annual gathering. “We are not only looking to root out those who engage in the trafficking of minors, but through our Office for Victim Assistance, we offer a lifeline to minors to help them escape from a virtual prison no person ever deserves.”

Operation Cross Country is part of the FBI’s Innocence Lost National Initiative, which began in 2003. Since its creation, the program has resulted in the identification and recovery of more than 6,000 children from child sex trafficking, and prosecutors have obtained 30 life sentences in cases against traffickers and their associates.

Over 400 law enforcement agencies across the country participated in this year’s operation.  Locally, the Grand Junction Police Department, the Mesa County Sheriff’s Office, the Fruita Police Department, the Colorado State Patrol, the Colorado Bureau of Investigation, the 21st Judicial District Attorney’s Office, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation worked together to make six arrests, including two men that are currently registered sex offenders:

  • Richard Delahanty, 48, of Cliftondelahanty
    • Internet Luring of a Child (F4)
    • Enticement of a Child (F4)
    • Sexual Assault on a Child (F4)
    • Pandering a Child (F3)
    • Patronizing a Prostituted Child (F3)
    • Soliciting for Prostitution (M3)
    • Distribution of Marijuana to a Minor (F4)
    • Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor (F4)
      • Released on a $10,000 Cash Bond
  • Frederick Norris, 52, of Grand Junctionnorris
    • Internet Luring of a Child (F4)
    • Enticement of a Child (F4)
    • Sexual Assault on a Child (F4)
    • Pandering a Child (F3)
    • Patronizing a Prostituted Child (F3)
    • Soliciting for Prostitution (M3)
    • Distribution of Marijuana to a Minor (F4)
    • Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor (F4)
      • Remains in Custody on a $10,000 Cash Bond
  • Louis Brewer, 47, of Grand Junctionbrewer
    • Internet Luring of a Child (F4)
    • Enticement of a Child (F4)
    • Sexual Assault on a Child (F4)
    • Pandering a Child (F3)
    • Patronizing a Prostituted Child (F3)
    • Soliciting for Prostitution (M3)
    • Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor (F4)
      • Remains in Custody on a $50,000 Cash Bond
  • Jared Brady, 36, of Grand Junction (current registered sex offender)brady
    • Internet Luring of a Child (F4)
    • Enticement of a Child (F4)
    • Sexual Assault on a Child (F4)
    • Patronizing a Prostituted Child (F3)
    • Soliciting for Prostitution (M3)
      • Remains in Custody on a $50,000 Cash Bond
  • Thomas Foley, 29, of Grand Junctionfoley
    • Internet Luring of a Child (F4)
    • Enticement of a Child (F4)
    • Sexual Assault on a Child (F4)
    • Pandering a Child (F3)
    • Patronizing a Prostituted Child (F3)
    • Soliciting for Prostitution (M3)
    • Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor (F4)
      • Released on a $50,000 PR Bond
  • Matthew Bear, 29, of Grand Junction (current registered sex offender)bear
    • Internet Luring of a Child (F4)
    • Enticement of a Child (F4)
    • Patronizing a Prostituted Child (F3)
    • Soliciting for Prostitution (M3)
    • Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor (F4)
      • Remains in Custody on $50,000 Cash Bond

GJPD Taking Back Unwanted Prescription Drugs #GVCopBeat #ShareGJ

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take-back-imageGRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO – On Saturday, October 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Grand Junction Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will give the public its 12th opportunity in six years to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your pills for disposal to the GJPD lobby at 555 Ute Avenue.  (The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches.)  The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

Last April, Americans turned in 447 tons (over 893,000 pounds) of prescription drugs at almost 5,400 sites operated by the DEA and more than 4,200 of its state and local law enforcement partners.  In Grand Junction, we accepted well over 200 pounds of unwanted medications for safe disposal.  Overall, in its 11 previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners have taken in over 6.4 million pounds—about 3,200 tons—of pills.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs.  Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash—both pose potential safety and health hazards.

For more information about the disposal of prescription drugs or about the October 22 Take Back Day event, go to the DEA Diversion website or contact the GJPD at (970)549-5114.

Thank You, Aidan and Family #NeverForget

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001We recently received some hats and coins in the mail.

We have some hats and coins. They’re pretty commonly traded between law enforcement agencies.  But these hats and coins are especially significant.  These hats and coins were sent to us from a family by the name of Huczko.  They were sent to us as a thank you for our participation in the Concerns of Police Survivors Outward Bound event.  You see, Aidan Huczko is a young man who has had the wonderful, terrible opportunity to participate in this excursion for the past two years, where young people from around the country gather in Grand Junction each summer, and then travel to Moab for a week long rafting trip.

We say wonderful because, by all accounts, it’s a really fun trip with incredible leadership, and lifelong friendships are formed.

We say terrible because, in order to be eligible for the trip, all of these young people had to lose a law enforcement parent in the line of duty.

Aidan’s dad, Steve, served for 15 years as a police officer for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Steve was among so many other indescribably brave souls who rushed toward the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

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Officer Stephen Huczko

Steve, 44, was a husband and father who worked nights as a police officer while he earned his nursing degree. He was also an avid runner, completing the New York City marathon in 2000, as well as participating with his children in triathlons.  Liam, one of Aidan’s three older siblings, followed in his father’s footsteps, and graduated as a Port Authority officer in 2014.  He now wears his father’s badge number.

 

Our participation in this program is not especially involved, or complicated. Our officers are honored to plan activities for the kids while they’re here for one night.  We provide transportation from the airport to the hotel as the kids trickle in from all over.  We arrange for meals with the partnership of local businesses.  We plan an outing for the evening; this year it was roller skating, laser tag, bowling, and video games at a local entertainment center.

It’s a privilege to do something—anything—to give back to those that sacrificed so much for public service. Most of our officers have kids of their own.  The C.O.P.S. kids feel like every cop’s kids.

So, please allow us to thank you, Aidan and family.  The pleasure to know you is most distinctly ours.

Concerns of Police Survivors is a non-profit organization that provides a myriad of services to families that have experienced a line of duty death. They are funded by grants and donations.  Should you feel moved to contribute to this incredibly worthy cause, check out their website at http://www.concernsofpolicesurvivors.org.

Arrest Made in 1600 North Avenue Incident #GVCopBeat

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cuffsAn arrest has been made in the incident that occurred yesterday at 1600 North Avenue.

The investigation by the multi-jurisdictional Critical Incident Response Team (CIRT) has led to the arrest of 20 year old Michael Camacho. After medical treatment for non-life threatening injuries, Camacho was transported to the Mesa County Jail on charges of First Degree Assault on a Peace Officer, a class three felony, and Menacing, a class five felony. Camacho is being held on a $10,000 bond.  A booking photo for Camacho is not available at this time.

(Assault in the First Degree can be charged when, “with intent to cause serious bodily injury upon the person of a peace officer…, he or she threatens with a deadly weapon a peace officer…engaged in the performance of his or her duties”).

kennedy%2c-codyThe officer involved in this incident is Corporal Cody Kennedy, who has served with the Grand Junction Police Department since 2005. Corporal Kennedy is a member of our SWAT team, as well as a training officer for our department. His photo is attached.

Corporal Kennedy remains on administrative leave, pending the outcome of an internal investigation. The criminal investigation into this incident by the CIRT team is ongoing.

Update to Incident at 1600 North Avenue #GVCopBeat

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IMG_0390Earlier this afternoon, we posted a brief statement on our Facebook page regarding an incident that occurred today in the 1600 Block of North Avenue.  Following are some additional details regarding that incident.

We can now confirm that the initial call for this incident, which came in shortly after noon, was from an individual who said his neighbor had accidentally shot himself in the chest. It was then stated that the neighbor may have been playing with a bullet that “exploded.” The reporting party stated that the injured neighbor was believed to be intoxicated, and it was unknown if this was possibly a suicide attempt. The reporting party stated that the injured man had walked back to his own apartment, after asking the reporting party to call an ambulance. The reporting party also observed that the subject had a gun in his hand.

When officers arrived on scene, they were able at various points to observe the subject with what appeared to be a gun in his hand. Officers were able to make verbal contact with the male, but the male was not compliant with officer’s instructions.

At one point during this incident when the subject was outside, an officer with the GJPD did discharge at least one round from a firearm. It is unknown at this time if the subject was struck, or if his injuries were sustained prior to the arrival of law enforcement. Less lethal rounds were also deployed at some time during the incident. Ultimately, the subject did comply with officers, and was detained without further incident. The subject was transported to the hospital with injuries that did not appear to be life threatening, but the extent is unknown. There were no other injuries to anyone else involved.

As in any officer involved shooting, the multi-jurisdictional Critical Incident Response Team (CIRT) has been convened, and they will conduct the criminal investigation into the circumstances surrounding the shooting. The Grand Junction Police Department will conduct a parallel Internal Affairs review of the incident as well. The officer involved, an 11-year veteran of the GJPD, has been placed on Administrative Leave pending the outcome of the Internal Affairs review, as is standard protocol in such an incident.